I’ll be honest, I wasn’t the best student, not terrible either, generally A’s and B’s, but not really applied or driven.  I certainly wasn’t the one taking AP classes or getting college credit in high school.  I basically did what I had to for the grade and got out.

College, phew, that was fun, I had a double degree in the Creative Arts programs, which meant lots of fascinating and sometimes disturbing ideas and a lot of reading (generally 1,000+ pages a week!) Yikes!

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At the end, I just wanted to read something I picked.  So I did.  I started with juvenile fiction. They were short, entertaining and had interesting themes.  Then, as my first child grew older, I began to devour parenting books.  They didn’t give me an instruction manual with her, but they did give me Your Baby’s First Year  by The American Academy of Pediatrics and Stephen P. Shelov, M.D.  Every few months, I would open the book, read the different topics associated with the upcoming months and feel a bit less like I was bumbling my way through.


Eventually, I moved on to non-fiction: self-help books as I’ve heard many people refer to them in a somewhat supercilious tone.  I enjoyed learning interesting facts, applying new ways of thinking or acting.  I liked the way that someone else’s expertise was having a positive impact on mine and my family’s life.  

Benjamin Franklin said,

“An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest.”

 

I was finding that to be true.  Not only was I well rewarded, in the moment, when I sat down to read an article or book, but months and years later as I was applying that knowledge in my life.  

I was also learning that knowledge + some form of action was making the biggest impact.  So, I began to experiment with new ideas and write them down, which has ultimately led me to this blog.  I believe that education as moms is important, a lifelong process and sometimes hard to come by and that we all gain by sharing what we know with one another.  That is why, I hope you will join me.  In the gaining and sharing of knowledge not only are the lives of moms improved, but also of their children.

 

Write it down in a journal, talk it over with a friend or leave a comment below or on Facebook.

And just to remind us that while we’re learning we’re teaching, too, here’s a video from kid president.